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The nest, lined with twigs and grass, is built on a ledge on the rock wall, and will be used for several years. A single egg is laid.
The young birds remain in the nest for over 100 days. The chicks are tiny and covered with duvet at first. The juvenile plumage develops gradually.
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Reproduction

Vultures start their reproduction cycle very early in the year, in December or January.

Couples have a long-term relationship and clearly appreciate each other's company.

Joint superposed nuptial flights are particularly difficult to arrange: the female often takes the initiative for these flights (apparently to give her the opportunity of choosing the male with the best flight skills).

Copulation takes place in winter after these nuptial flights.

Nesting:

The nest, lined with twigs and grass, is built on a ledge on the rock wall, and will be used for several years. Males and females take turns to brood the single egg, sitting perfectly still for hours, until it hatches after 54 to 58 days. Reproduction success rates vary: some couples often fail, where others almost always succeed.

Raising the youngster in the nest:

The young chicks stay in the nest for over 100 days. During hot weather the adults protect their chicks from the sun by spreading their wings to act as a screen. The chicks are tiny and covered with duvet at first. The juvenile plumage, with its characteristic brown ruff, develops gradually.

Before their first flight, the young birds exercise their wings strenuously to build their muscles. In the early summer, while the youngsters are learning to fly, mortality is high due to poor flight skills (the only way to learn is by trial and error) and malnutrition faced with competition from more experienced birds.